Winter bird

Flying in a bit late for Draw-a-Bird-Day, this immature or female Pine Grosbeak (Pinicola enucleator) was eating tiny crabapples in Mill Creek Ravine Park, in late November 2017. Pine Grosbeaks bite through the skin of crabapples, eat the seeds and discard the pulp. They do the same with mountain ash berries. Realistically, the feathers of immature and female birds are grey and orange, but I … Continue reading Winter bird

Last December…

Today was my final exam for principles of ecology. The snowshoe hare came up in a few of the exam questions, so I thought this would be a good day to publish a post I started earlier this year and finished a few weeks ago. A little after sunset, on December 9th 2017, the white rabbit appeared, well a hare actually, or more precisely a … Continue reading Last December…

The Coopers: Part 3

On July 15th, 2017, around 3 PM, I walked along the trail leading to the Cooper’s Hawk nest. The first fledgling I saw was the youngest looking. Another fledgling, of seemingly intermediate maturity (less remaining white down than one sibling but more than the other), was calling its parents repeatedly, because it was hungry, or because it was not comfortable with my presence. It called … Continue reading The Coopers: Part 3

They’re back!

According to eBird data, Common Redpolls are not seen in the Edmonton area between June and September, except for the sighting of a single bird on July 5th, 2014. Their breeding grounds are north of Alberta, in Alaska, the Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. The Atlas of Breeding Birds of Alberta (Semenchuk 1992) does mention occasional nesting in Edmonton. This species also breeds in … Continue reading They’re back!

DABD November 2018

Happy Draw-A-Bird-Day!!! Last fall I saw four species of warblers migrate through the Strathcona Rail Community Garden – Palm (drawing), Tennessee, Orange-crowned and Yellow-rumped. Fall warblers also refuel in the forests along the creek and river near my home, but the garden is the easiest place to photograph the birds. There are no tall trees to cast shade on waist-high plants and there are lots … Continue reading DABD November 2018