Tits, bushtits and penduline tits

I drew these Black-throated tits, a.k.a. Black-throated bushtits, a.k.a. Aegithalos concinnus, a.k.a. Mésange à tête rousse, from a photo on Pinterest because they are cute, strikingly patterned and resemble chickadees. I couldn’t find any information on the photographer. The last drawing I posted was of a Black-capped chickadee and drawing it reminded me of a more colourful but similarly shaped and patterned bird that I … Continue reading Tits, bushtits and penduline tits

Warmer weather and a Red-breasted Nuthatch

  Yay! The two week super chill has left the city! I celebrated by going for a walk through the forest in a balmy -6 ℃.   Though I visit the north end of Mill Creek Ravine Park regularly and often hear nuthatches (Red-breasted or White-breasted… I can’t always differentiate their calls), I don’t usually get a good look at them and I rarely get … Continue reading Warmer weather and a Red-breasted Nuthatch

Winter bird

Flying in a bit late for Draw-a-Bird-Day, this immature or female Pine Grosbeak (Pinicola enucleator) was eating tiny crabapples in Mill Creek Ravine Park, in late November 2017. Pine Grosbeaks bite through the skin of crabapples, eat the seeds and discard the pulp. They do the same with mountain ash berries. Realistically, the feathers of immature and female birds are grey and orange, but I … Continue reading Winter bird

Bird bones

It’s a headless, neckless, one-legged and one-armed Glossy Ibis skeleton! I partially and approximately re-drew it from Katrina van Grouw’s beautiful Glossy Ibis skeleton in her book The Unfeathered Bird. If you find bird skeletons intriguing, this book is must-see eye candy and wonderfully informative too. A while back, I posted a drawing of a feathered bird wing. While doing research for that post, I … Continue reading Bird bones

They’re back!

According to eBird data, Common Redpolls are not seen in the Edmonton area between June and September, except for the sighting of a single bird on July 5th, 2014. Their breeding grounds are north of Alberta, in Alaska, the Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. The Atlas of Breeding Birds of Alberta (Semenchuk 1992) does mention occasional nesting in Edmonton. This species also breeds in … Continue reading They’re back!