Gwyndolyn’s nest: Part 1

I first noticed Gwyndolyn’s nest on April 11th (this year). She chose the little grassy island on the northeastern side of the Children’s Hospital Pond to incubate her eggs for about 4 weeks.

The pond was on my way to work, so I would stop by at least twice a week to see what Gwyndolyn and the other birds were up to. I never saw George, her mate, on the island during the incubation period. He was always on the northwestern side of the pond, swimming or eating grass. The day after the little ones hatched, he joined Gwyndolyn on the island and after that, I always saw the whole family together.

Shortly before the ice thawed in March (spring came early this year), Canada Geese were the first waterbirds to arrive at the pond. I remember seeing 4 or 6 at a time, flying over and around the pond, then landing, honking a lot, chasing each other and showing each other their impressive wingspans. But in April, Gwyndolyn and George were the only Canada Geese on the pond.

I took many photos of Gwyndolyn (of the white eyebrows). I thought I’d start with a little slideshow of the time she spent sitting on her eggs. The cute little yellow fluff-balls with appear in Part 2!

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15 Comments

  1. Thanks for sharing your observation story….so sweet andfun to watch birds. I watch wood ducks in April during their mating season. I’m looking forward to more of your post on bird watching.

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    1. Thanks for your lovely comment, Lois. I remember the journal with watercolour paintings which you published on your blog. Such a beautiful memoir of your time watching Wood Ducks and other birds at the Earth Sanctuary. Your painting of the nesting goose reminded me of Gwyndolyn. 🙂

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      1. My discovery of creating my own watercolor journals has been a fun adventure; one I can continue through my life time. I enjoy sharing my stories of nature as I see it. Thanks so much for your comments of support. I also enjoy reading your observation of nature posts on your blog. Many thanks to you.

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  2. What a good looking goose she is, and such a wonderful series! I’m looking forward to Part II and the goslings!

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    1. Thanks for your lovely comment, Deborah :-). The curious little newborn goslings will appear soon.

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  3. She is a beautiful goose! The ones that don’t migrate are so numerous here, nesting right in the middle of parking lots, that we stop noticing that they are beautiful.

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    1. Giggles! If you have a photo I would be so curious to see a goose nest in a parking lot! 🙂 (It sounds hilarious but kind of awful.)

      Her single goose nest in the area definitely gave her a special beauty. If she had been one of twenty, I probably wouldn’t have noticed her. There was something special about watching her remain on her little island for 3 weeks, day and night, rain or shine, while the grass grew taller and greener around her.

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      1. This spring I will watch for one and take a photo for you 🙂
        I’m glad you got to see one in a more special light.

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  4. Really nice photos again, Myriam. And I love the way you always write so interestingly about the birds you have photographed.
    I can’t wait to see the little fluff-balls! 🙂

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    1. Thanks for your kind words, Hanna! 🙂 Fluff-balls photos coming soon…

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  5. […] On May 6th, the goslings left the nest to explore other parts of the pond world. Gosling adventures await in Part 3! For photos of Gwyndolyn sitting on her eggs, check out Part 1. […]

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  6. Superbe reportage photo, merci Myriam !
    Seb

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  7. […] feathers. I’ll leave these for Part 4. For photos of Gwyndolyn sitting on her eggs, see Part 1. See Part 2 for photos of the newly hatched […]

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