Confederation Park – a Northern Waterthrush and a few other birds

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Northern Waterthrush

On August 25th, I met the “migratory alter ego” of a Northern Waterthrush hopping along the narrow, sandy bank of the small island where the Confederation Park creek bifurcates. I was crouching on the opposite bank, in tall grasses and scratchy thistles, watching a Solitary Sandpiper wading in shallow water and probing the water’s surface to catch aquatic insects or other small invertebrates. Five other Solitary Sandpipers were also foraging nearby.

Solitary Sandpiper

Solitary Sandpiper

Two Solitary Sandpipers or a Solitary Sandpiper and a Lesser Yellowlegs. The shorebird on the right has bright yellow legs, while the other has greenish yellow legs, but both look like the same species otherwise.

Two Solitary Sandpipers or a Solitary Sandpiper (left) and a Lesser Yellowlegs (right). The shorebird on the right has bright yellow legs, while the other has greenish yellow legs, but both look like the same species otherwise.

Like Solitary Sandpipers, Northern Waterthrushes eat mostly insects. They forage in shallower water than the longer-legged sandpipers or on the moist shore. The waterthrush sauntered along the shore for a minute or so, occasionally teeter-tottering its head down and tail up, and then disappeared into the island’s dense underbrush. A few times, the waterthrush reappeared to repeat this process. Once a Lincoln’s Sparrow showed up on the narrow sand strip. Without a telescoping lens, it was the same size and colour as the waterthrush, but it did not wander along the shore before returning to the underbrush. Like the Northern Waterthrush, Lincoln’s Sparrows mostly eat invertebrates caught by ground foraging and occasionally catch insects by flycatching (catching in flight). Unlike waterthrushes, Lincoln’s Sparrows can also eat seeds, which are their main winter food source.

Lincoln's Sparrow

Lincoln’s Sparrow

Despite its name, the Northern Waterthrush does not belong to the Thrush family, like the American Robin. It is a Wood-Warbler, like the Yellow Warbler and American Redstart. On the Birds Calgary blog, a while back, I’d read that Confederation Park is a good place to see migrating warblers in Calgary from late August to mid-September. I did see a variety of warblers on August 24th and 25th. I had some trouble photographing them since they moved a lot in densely foliaged bushes. But it was fun to see some species I’d never seen before. I found the juveniles of some species quite hard to identify. In some warbler species, the juvenile plumage colours are similar to those of other species. Also, juvenile plumage can be quite different from adult male breeding plumage.

Wilson's Warbler (male)

Wilson’s Warbler (adult male)

Easy to identify!

Juvenile Blackpoll Warbler

I initially thought this little one was a juvenile Bay-breasted Warbler. But after some research, I learned that Bay-breasted and Blackpoll Warbler juveniles have very similar plumage. The legs, however, tell them apart. Juvenile Blackpoll Warblers have yellow legs while juvenile Bay-breasted Warblers have grey legs (Powdermill Bird Banding Fall 2009).

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Juvenile Blackpoll Warbler

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Juvenile Chestnut-sided Warbler

This juvenile was easy to identify with its almost neon grey-greenish-yellow crown, nape and back, its two broad white wingbars and its white eye ring. However, it looks very different from the adults, who actually have chestnut coloured sides.

Juvenile Chestnut-sided Warbler

Juvenile Chestnut-sided Warbler

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American Redstart (female or juvenile)

I also saw a few flycatchers and warbling vireos.

An olive-sided flycatcher and a Tennessee Warbler. Confederation Park, Calgary. August 25th, 2016.

An Olive-sided Flycatcher (left) and a Tennessee Warbler (right)

Least Flycatcher

Least Flycatcher

Warbling Vireo

Warbling Vireo

According to the introduction for Northern Waterthrushes in The Birds of North America Online, Northern Waterthrushes have distinct breeding ground and migrating personalities, hence the “migratory alter ego”. When I read about their breeding ground behaviour, I thought it would be a treat to observe that personality too.

The Northern Waterthrush is a bird of the northern forests, adding its loud, ringing song to the wooded swamps, bogs, and banks of North America’s great rivers and lake shores. Those familiar with this species on its breeding grounds know it for its spirited demeanor characterized by sharp chip calls, emphatic song, and energetic movements. It is also appreciated for its effervescent evening flight song, which compliments those of thrushes and the winnowing of snipes in the boreal forest evensong. However those who know the Northern Waterthrush well also know how seamlessly it switches to its alter ego—a furtive, skulking bird of thickets and shadowy understories. This is the personality familiar to many North American birdwatchers, who see it only on migration in back yards, city parks, and wet places, as it migrates to and from its wintering grounds in the tropical mangroves of Central and South America.

Whitaker, Darroch M. and Stephen W. Eaton. 2014. Northern Waterthrush (Parkesia noveboracensis), The Birds of North America Online (A. Poole, Ed.). Ithaca: Cornell Lab of Ornithology; Retrieved from the Birds of North America Online: http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna/species/182

Northern Waterthrush

Northern Waterthrush

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14 Comments

  1. Oh how I enjoyed this birding adventure with you, Myriam. Warblers and flycatchers, juveniles, they can be tricky to ID, but really fun to spend time with.

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    1. Thanks so much, Jet! I’d initially thought of doing a shorter post about only the waterthrush, but the larger adventure enticed me to say and show a little more. 🙂

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  2. What a fantastic week-end of birding you had! Such a lovely series of the Waterthrush, and other birds.

    I’ve never seen many of the birds in this post!

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. Thanks so much for enjoying the photos, Deborah :-)! Glad you got to see a few birds you haven’t met yet. I was lucky that someone else wrote a blog post about fall warbler migration in that park.

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  3. I really enjoy these birding forays with you. I love the variations in plumage, even though I’m at a total loss when it comes to differentiating them.

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    1. Thanks, Melissa! 🙂 I’m so glad you enjoyed this little bird photo trip. I think everyone has difficulty identifying fall warblers. I took pictures of a lot of warblers I couldn’t identify!

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  4. How interesting! Thanks for a very educational post. 🙂
    Those warblers sure can be tricky, sometimes I am just not sure.

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    1. Thanks, Hazel! Glad you enjoyed the photos and information :-). For some warblers, unless I have clear photos of them from all angles, I just can’t identify them. When I look at photos of people banding warblers, the differences are easier to see.

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  5. I like sandpipers. 🙂

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  6. I take my hat off to you, for working so diligently to identify these difficult birds – even seeing them is hard, then you manage to photograph them and sort out the juvies – excellent! I love the closed eyelid on the Solitary sandpiper….

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    1. Thanks for your kind words, Lynn :-). I’m so glad you like the closed eyelid! I thought it was a fun change from the usual open eye.

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